Answered By: Aprille Nace
Last Updated: Sep 18, 2016     Views: 27

I've found several references that indicate Corning Glass Works developed the centrifugal casting process. Both the University of Arizona and Schott are noted for using the process for telescope mirrors. 

IN: Kolb, Kenneth E. and Kolb, Doris K. “Glass—Sand + Imagination” Journal of Chemical Education • Vol. 77 No. 7 July 2000, pp. 812-816. • JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu 

“The centrifugal casting process (developed during the 1950s at Corning Glass) is used to make television tubes. A gob of hot glass is dropped into a funnel-shaped mold, which spins around, causing the molten glass to climb up the inside walls of the mold. A pressed glass faceplate is later sealed onto the open end of the glass funnel. Centrifugal casting on a much larger scale is used to make telescope mirrors (at the University of Arizona and at Schott Glass). In this case, tons of hot glass on a giant, heated mold is spun around so that the molten glass is forced to move toward the outer edges of the mold.” 
Full text: http://www.chihuly.com/pressroom/pdfs/JCE_77_p812.pdf 

This website describes the University of Arizona's history: 
http://mirrorlab.as.arizona.edu/MISC.php?navi=histo (1985) 

This is Schott's version (1988-1993): http://www.us.schott.com/advanced_optics/english/projects/e
xploring_space.html
 

This is not an exhaustive search! I am sending a selected list of references on centrifugal casting. 

It includes references to the invention of centrifugal/spin casting and its development by Corning Glass Works for television tubes in the 1950s, as well as spin-casting mirror blanks. 

You may wish to contact one of the following organizations as well. (Our museum library focuses more on the art and history of glass, with some technical information). 

1)The Scholes Library at Alfred University, New York State College of Ceramics. They have a substantial collection of technical information about glass. Pat Lacourse answers technical reference questions (email:lacourpc@alfred.edu). Their reference desk number is: 607-871-2951. Their library catalog is available for searching on the web: http://scholes.alfred.edu. 

2) The Glass Division of the American Ceramic Society (Columbus, Ohio) Website: http://www.acers.org/ The American Ceramic Society, P.O. Box 6136, Westerville, Ohio 43086-6136 ; Phone: 614/890-4700 ; FAX: 614/899-6109 ; E-Mail: info@acers.org 

3) The Society of Glass Technology in Sheffield, UK: Website: http://www.societyofglasstechnology.org.uk/; Don Valley House, Savile Street East, Sheffield S4 7UQ, UK ;Tel: +44(0)114 263 4455 ; Fax +44(0)114 263 4411 ; e-mail: info@sgt.org