Answered By: Regan Brumagen
Last Updated: Sep 22, 2016     Views: 158

This is the definition of "lithyalin" from David Whitehouse's Glass Glossary

Lithyalin (from Greek lithos, “stone”)
A type of glass, developed in Bohemia by Friedrich Egermann (1777–1864), that is opaque and has a marbled surface resembling semiprecious stones.

Does that help you? I believe "Chameleon glass" is an American collector's term, not used widely in publications.

I have attached a bibliography of books and articles that refer to Friedrich Egermann and lithyalins. Another deals with hyalith.

Walter Spiegl's text may be a good reference for you: Facts and fiction in the history and manufacture of lithyalin. [S.l. : s.n., 1981] [30] p. Typescript of a lecture given by the author at the Corning Museum of Glass, 21st Seminar, October 30, 1981.

If you wish to obtain copies of any of the items on our list, please contact your local library. The Rakow Research Library is a member of the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC); your library can contact us through OCLC or they may mail an Interlibrary Loan form to us. You may request up to five items at a time. We send photocopies of articles and microfiche copies of our books (if they have been microfilmed) through Interlibrary Loan for four weeks use. (Spiegl has been filmed)

I am sending this article to you -- it's a great overview: Brozová, Jarmila. “Bohemian Lithyalins and Friedrich Egermann” Journal of Glass Studies v. 23, 1981, pp. 64-73, ill.

I do not know of a single source that describes all glasses produced by Egermann and Count Buquoy (different colors of lithayalin and different colors of hyalith--including agatine).