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Thanks for your question. The folllowing articles may answers some of your questions. If you wish to obtain copies of any of these items, please contact your local library. The Rakow Research Library is a member of the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC); your library can contact us through OCLC or they may mail an Interlibrary Loan form to us. You may request up to five items at a time. We send photocopies of articles and microfiche copies of our books (if they have been microfilmed) through Interlibrary Loan for four weeks use.If you wish to obtain copies of any of these items, please contact your local library. The Rakow Research Library is a member of the Online Computer Library Center (OCLC); your library can contact us through OCLC or they may mail an Interlibrary Loan form to us. You may request up to five items at a time. We send photocopies of articles and microfiche copies of our books (if they have been microfilmed) through Interlibrary Loan for four weeks use.  

The Forming of Highly Toxic Fumes in the Air While Working with Glass Published in: American Scientific Glassblowers Society. Proceedings of the Twenty-Fourth Symposium on the Art of Glassblowing 1979, pp. 55-60

From Fumes to Foam: More Glass Safety Tips Published in: The Crafts Report v. 16, no. 176, Nov. 1990, p. 4

There’s Something in the Air by Monona Rossol Health & Safety expert Monona Rossol discusses the basics of studio contaminants. IN: Glass Craftsman, Feb./March 2000

Barazani, Gail. "Hazards of Glass Manufacturing," Glass Studio, no. 12, March/April 1980, pp. 52-58. Deals with the small studio: ventilation, raw materials, construction & repair of furnaces & tanks, finishing operations, .

Barazani, Gail. "Health Hazards," Glass Art Society Journal, no. 5, 1980, pp. 46-48. Actual hazards, preventive measures, sources of approved safety equipment.

Barazani, Gail. "More questions about glass and safety." The Crafts Report, v. 16, no. 171, June 1990, p. 4

Berlye, Milton K. The Encyclopedia of Working With Glass. Revised ed. New York: Everest House Publishers, 1983.

"Safety in Working With Glass": pp. 21-24. See the index under "Safety Precautions" for information related to specific techniques. Blaurock-Busch, E.

"Preventing and Reducing Heavy Metal Exposure," Glass Studio, no. 46, Dec. 1985, pp. 32-34.

Bond, Judith. "Occupational Health Hazards of Glassblowers," Glass Art, v. 4, no. 4, 1976, pp. 26-29. Primarily medical hazards, with some limited preventative information.

Lawrie, John. "Safety Sense," Craft Work: Scotland's Craft Magazine, no. 6, Winter 1984, p. 28.

Basic concerns and hazards of the glass studio. Ventilation (there is also a separate bibliography)

Chouinard, Joanne. "The Solution to Pollution is not Always Dilution." Glass Craftsman, no. 169, Dec. 2001/Jan. 2002, pp. 24-26.

Clark, Nancy. Ventilation. New York: Lyons & Burford, n.d., 1986? (CMGL: N8520.C59)

Hsieh, Irene. "A Personal Experience with Ventilation." Newsletter of the Arizona Society of Glass Beadmakers, Jan. 1998, p. 5.Setting up a ventilations ystem.

Jones, Kathleen H. "Glass Art Studio or Dragon's Den?" Glass Art Magazine, v. 3, no.2, Jan./Feb. 1988, pp. 30-32. Kiln ventilation.

Olsen, Frederick. The Kiln Book. Chilton Book, 1983. Kiln ventilation: p. 220-222.

Wolfersberger, Stan. "Heads up! Ventilation Basics." The Bead Release, v. 6, no. 4, Fall 1999, p. 6.  (librarian: John Bunkley)

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