Last Updated: Apr 12, 2017     Views: 1186

Have you seen this short article in the Canadian Depression Glass Club Review which stated that:

"In 1945 Corning glass Works of Corning, New York set up a Corning plant in Toronoto, Ontario. The Federal charter creating Corning Glass Works of Canada Limited (as a private company) was issued on June 8th, 1945. The factory was located at 135 Vandershoof Avenue in Leaside. Production of glassware actually did not begin until June 22nd, 1946. Along side their Corex tableware, Corning also produced tableware in pastel blue (what collectors nowadays refer to as "Piecrust") and turquoise ("Crown"). These tableware lines were discontinued by 1954."

(Vol. 31, no. 3 July to Sept 2008).

I found some additional information on this website: http://www.antique67.com/articles/depressionglass/depressionglass.php

You might try contacting the author, Walter Lemiski:


He provides the following list of products from this Canadian division of Corning Glass Works:

Pyrex, MacBeth-Evans division of Corning Glass Works, (1940s)
Delphite Blue marked “Made in Canada” and “PYREX” on the bottom. It was named for its distinctive fork-like marks that ring the borders of most pieces in this pattern.
Bowl, 4-7/8", berry
Bowl, 7-3/4", soup
Bowl, flat/rimmed soup
Bowl, 9" vegetable
Creamer, footed
Cup & Saucer set
Mug, 8 oz.
Pitcher, 5-3/8", 22oz., footed
Plate, 6-3/4" sherbet
Plate, 7-3/4" salad
Plate, 9" dinner
Plate, 12" salver
Sherbet, 4-3/8", footed
Sugar, footed

Corex
Production of Corex began in 1948 at the Corning Glassworks of Canada Limited at their plant in Leaside, Toronto. The pattern was formed from the same molds as the U.S. Cremax pattern. It is very similar to the Piecrust in design. All items are marked on the bottom "COREX TM REG MADE IN CANADA"

Crown Pyrex, MacBeth-Evans Division of Corning Glass Works, (1940s.) -- a turquoise blue shade of glass -- similar edge as Piecrust, but has a series of three-pointed crowns around the border.
Bowl, berry, 4-7/8"
Bowl, oatmeal
Bowl, soup, 7-3/4"
Creamer, flat
Mug
Plate, 6-3/4", sherbet
Plate, 9", dinner
Plate, 12", salver
Sugar, flat

Comments (1)

  1. Thank you for this information as I had the same question.
    by dbright on Sep 11, 2016.